authors, books, fiction, interviews, kids books, murder-mystery, mystery, New Release

In the Words of an Author: An Interview with Robyn Washington

 

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Author Biography

Starting out in Seattle in a military family, Robyn’s family moved to North Carolina where she was raised in a family of six siblings. Being the oldest child, she had to learn how to make up stories to survive in a competitive family. Storytelling became easy for Robyn, and she started to pen romantic stories, children’s books and mystery novels at an early age. She progressed to writing journals and blogs, and later to novellas, plays, skits and her first published book. Graduating with a B.S. in Biology, an M.B.A in Business Administration, she has worked in the business world most of her life, but her passion is to excel in writing and brand her next series featuring stories on Children’s Books.

 

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

 

My favorite authors are the following: Nora Roberts, John Grisham, James Patterson, Dean Koontz, Charles Dickens, Stephen King, Mark Twain, J. K. Rowling, and Danielle Steele. I can’t even mention all the authors I’ve read. Some are unknown, and I read just about anything to learn and for pleasure. I’ve been known just to get a biology book down and start reading From plays to history, science to romance novels, reading has been a favorite hobby of mine for years.

 

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

My favorite character was Jade, a CIA agent. Trying to write from a federal agent’s perspective and one who has been shafted was extremely hard. Penning emotions and fleshing out the character can be hard when tagging them with specific characteristics.

 

What are the most difficult scenes for you to write?

The most difficult scenes to write were the action scenes where confrontations occurred. I have two new books coming out soon in the month of February 2018, Deception, Love & Lies Part 2 and New Beginnings that have scenes that I had to rewrite so many times until it stressed me out. I had to teach myself how to write with continuity and make the topic interesting for readers. Romance novels are my favorite to read, but I don’t write steamy punk love scenes. Although I may read one occasionally, I like a story with a learning curve and a romance linked to the storyline.

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What is the most rewarding part of being an author for you?

 

The most rewarding part of being an author is that I get to create, design, draw, imagine, deliver, and make-up stories as I go along. I have a very wild imagination and can step out of my mind at any time and write what I feel. The hardest part is when you come back and edit your words, change it around, and forget what you were trying to say. I want a reaction out of my readers, and I’ve got to master the art. I understand now why movie directors try to get a rise out of the audience, it makes sales.

 

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

A good story needs to be adequately researched, so the facts match what you’re writing about. Mysteries need to have a good twist, romance novels need to be unique, murder scenes need to be fleshed out, and the facts need to be as real as possible. Inadequate info can turn readers off. Don’t get trapped by criticism, learn from what others say about your work. Visit author’s groups and participate, create a blog, create and tweet, become friends with colleagues, and ask questions whenever you can. As a previous science teacher, asking questions always helps to increase the learning experience.

 

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

I have a room with crazy colors and designs to set the mood for me to write with a large desk, a comfortable chair, a tv, a bright light, and then I try to write every day. There is no set time, but when I enter my space, I spend time researching, reading, writing, or creating an outline for a book. I carry a notebook and pen in my pocketbook at all times, and sometimes use my iPhone to capture ideas or thoughts. Explosions can occur everywhere. The first process for me in writing a book is to create an outline, jot down thoughts, ideas, and create a plot for the story.

 

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

No, I wanted to be a doctor, but I changed my major, so many times in college it was funny. I have worked in management and business most of my life and even taught school for a short while. My interest in science and animals has been a focal point in my life and lead me to start publishing my work.

 

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

My father. He died when I was a child and knowing him would have been the highlight of my life. People don’t know what they’re missing when they miss out on knowing their parents.

 

Where can readers go to find out about you and your books?

Coming soon a Pinterest link, but below are my Facebook and Twitter accounts for Robyn Washington.

https://twitter.com/RobynSeattle

https://www.facebook.com/RobynSeattle/

 

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Synopsis:

After a lifetime of a broken marriage, zoo owner, Barry Weinstein is persuaded by his longtime friend, Chad Everette, an MI6, to buy two Amur Leopards for the zoo. The Leopards become the featured attraction at the zoo and a baby cub, Malachi is born.

Life begins to change for Barry, and he must face his attraction to his new office administrator at his zoo, the curvy petite Gloria Peterson. But love is not that simple for Barry, and he runs. Tragedy strikes and Barry must face the battle from within himself to empty the darkness out of his soul.

Endowed with bad investments and massive debts, Chad falls in love with what he hates the most, an American CIA agent, the classy blonde Jade Ayers. Back in the USA, Jade is heading up an investigation involving six CIA agents that have been murdered in the last year in Afghanistan. When she finds out who’s involved, she becomes a suspect in her own investigation from London to all parts of the world. Love, adoption, greed, kidnapping, pain, torment, and endurance will be best experienced when everyone realizes what they’ve been chasing was right at their back door.

 

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authors, books, interviews, nonfiction

In the Words of An Author: An Interview With Atif A K, PhD

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Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

Well I started my fascination of reading with Arthur Conan Doyle and Ian Fleming but with the passage I also recognized my fancy for non-fiction so I would say if you keep aside the marketing/strategy/branding on the more personal side I like Eckhart Tolle. He is definitely not only an author but his works amplified because of his books. I also like Dr. Daniel Amen whose works with brain rewiring has really mesmerized me. Of course, Shakespeare is always there to provide a framework to anyones comprehension. I also like the Lebanese great Khalil Jibran and his works Broken Wings and Madman very inspiring. There is also a Pakistani writer Ashfaq Ahmed- whose philosophical works transcend universalism into humanism.

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

My inspiration to writing particularly screen-writing because thats where I write most of my characters- is totally driven from the unusual faces that I see. They all tell me a story and their mental ambience. The environments from where they are hailing. I understand these faces make my task easier to dramatize both as a writer and director. So before I even met them when I use them on screen- I have a fatal portrait in my head with a reference point of someone that I saw in the train or at the bank or merely hanging at my favorite bar or local cinema. The inspire me to tell their metaphysical tales that they never told me.  

For instance, I saw a homeless guy who could have been a body double of Gregory Pack- I saw him talking to himself, he was probably unwell. But that drove me to write the street actor character on my short film Do You Know Me? where his acting rehearsal/monologue was considered talking-to-himself by many strangers around.

I find talking to ones self extremely romantic and I have used it in my upcoming film The Disowned where Kay Gamaldi (the female lead/central character) talks to herself about her affair and where she stands in the relationship. I may say that all these characters are my favorite and are inter-related to my innate fair of never talking to myself. They are linked with my inner obscurities and social phobias. In terms of writing technique in The Disowned our male protagonist (Gil Gilead) is also antagonist and it will lot of fun unleashing and cheating the audience with his character and histrionic role.  A small glimpse into it can be seen here.

https://youtu.be/4DX4xp-AM0E

Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

I like to write scenes in which there are less dialogues and more non-verbal communication. The actors use their expressions, emotions and body language to communicate the sub-text of what’s being seen. It’s like a person who can’t hear or understands the language- even who cannot read closed captions would still understand where the scene is going.

Fortunately, we are writing in an age where new media and mainstream is too much reliant on independent artists- who take liberty to approaching subject matter from brand new angles. The other versions- so to say. Just last night I saw Shape of Water and I was fascinated how in a fantasy world Del Toro and Vanessa Taylor have tricked the audience while developing a plot by building it up. Fine lining the outcasts of the previous eras while legitimizing the beauty and beast concept in a distorted, spectacular and unusual way. Sort of breaking a taboo but at the same time leaving an untouched impression of a story strangely told by unusual characters.

So these kind of scenarios may be hard to depict by the book but surely leave a stellar impression and are easier to write- if you are immune to writing things from the unprecedented angles.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

Clarity of thought is the most prized possession for any writer. The ability to think through the storm and to be able to come out survivor is so much gratifying at least for me being a writer. If I write good couple of pages every morning as I wake up- 50% of task has been achieved for me for the rest of the day. Writing is cathartic, it is therapeutic- and like Ozzy Osborne once said- he would actually pay his audience if he had to, just to let him perform. So thats the most rewarding part- I would write for free. It is sort of confessional, and letting it off your chest or sharing the fire in your belly. After that there is calm, like after a tempest. But thats not easy being able to find that poise in the way you compose your writing. Apart from commercial writing, self-indulgent writing needs lot of discourse, contemplation and self conflicts. Yes, all the questions have to be answered before they are put on paper- and sometimes, these answers dont come easy. And sometimes they take lot of time. Its like a secret watch-tower in the writers head that leads the sail in the dark. This phenomenon is much more gratifying than any other feeling. When the sail reaches the shore. And of course, financial and other accolades follow the suit. Because this is a diamond that the writer brings from a distant mine that no body knows as it exists in the clumsy minds.   

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

Get solitary confinement in a hotel and start dreaming without being buffered by anyone or anything. Of course when you read 100 pages, you are then able to write one good page. Our brains are receptive when we have lot of reference memory and observation material around. You have to be compulsive thinker. Free-thinking has always worked for me and to be able to avoid any intellectual conflict or cognitive dissonance so to say is the way out as an artist and as an author.

Unfortunately, writing prospered when it was the only mode of entertainment. In the cross media age- writing is done for various platforms. But having said that every product and entertainment starts and ends with good writing. It cannot begin without someone sitting down and composing the ideas. So in a way the scope of writing has even widened. Although there has been tremendous development in new wave media and platforms but the enhancement is not that remarkable when it comes to writing technique. We are hooked on Stephen Kings and Rowlings along with Grishams. There is more to it- in terms of substance beyond genre. And that is the reason we see some of very predictable stories emerging to be huge like Twilight and Shades of Grey. Although it is essentially recycled material in a new setting- much like Shakespeare in a standard format. But when Romeo and Juliet or Midsummer Nights Dream or even Tempest was written there was no sign of screen and a bunch of actors will play it out on theater. In that sense such intricate content was hard to be communicated so easily. So we as writers who are just started out- must start thinking out of the box while not forgetting that we are slave to the comprehension of others so whatever we may tell should not be safe but it must fit the meter as we call it when we rhyme or create an even flow in writing.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

No writing comes to me instead of the other way around. When I feel desperate to put it on screen or note it in my iPhone pad that’s when the magic starts churning. I have no idea what I am about to write- unless it keeps lingering in my subconscious and just flushes out at a point where I cannot hold it anymore. Like a secret hard to carry around, or like being a witness to some crime. You need to tell, you can’t keep it to yourself. Because the self-contemplation and no being able to share the burden and experience will ultimately leave you with immense guilt. Which if not told on time and in time will stick like a dirty deed in my psychology forever.

So that’s how I write. I may be doing laundry, or swimming, or practicing Yoga, listening to a song or just searching on Google where I parked my car. While I might later realize that I took Uber instead of my car on the way back home- I have a great idea with me, that prompts me to write. So before I go back to the mall and find my lost car- I need to put it in Word. That’s my ritual- I need a solid excuse to prefer it over any other task in my life. And that has kept my flame alive and made people pay me for this dedication to this art form.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

Absolutely. I wanted to be an astronaut but then I found writing, as I was stuck on an Executive Floor of Marriott for 8 months. It was like solitary confinement, I was left with nothing but weird life concepts buzzing through my day- in and out. I had this urge to reflect on things the way they are and the way they should or can be. I think solitude is the excellent time, when one can find their calling. This is the reason of all the prisons- around the world. To give people time to reflect and fix. I am sure without solitude; one cannot acquire a set of skills to offer the world. There is no contribution, if you are not by yourself. After that bout, I spent another couple of years as my creative pilgrimage in a downtown hotel. There I used to watch movies, sleep, eat and repeat. Strum guitar once in a while, work online and order food through room service. 

This kept on, until I was left with nothing else to do but write. I was also fortunate enough to be able to write couple of books as ghostwriter, to understand the challenges and review the process from inception to cover design. The research, statistics and reference studies all proved to be the honing ground for my creative maturity.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

William Peter Bletty writer of Exorcist as to what was going through his mind when he wrote this. This has remained to be a timeless classic and masterpiece. Ahead of time and will always be- to the point when humans can develop the technology to reach out to another dimension and communicate with dead souls. I know there was some case in Germany little similar to what was depicted in the book. But the way it was written in a passive manner was both shocking, extremely dramatic and urges you to revisit your faith or school of thought. Thats the power of writing, its like a punch on your face. His later works didnt strike the right note with the masses but thats what writing is- once the world discovers you, you are lost as a writer.   

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

Couple of pages from the book that are published on EZine Articles. Feel free to check them out.

http://ezinearticles.com/expert/Atif_A_K/2465019  

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Curious to know more? Check out these links:

http://a.co/0d8IEBM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=1IHKY0Rv01g
authors, books, children's literature, christian fiction, christian literature, interviews, kids books, poetry

In the Words of an Author: An Interview with Sandi Smith

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

I have followed two wonderful authors – Maeve Binchy and Fannie Flagg.

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Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

Well, for my children’s books I would have to say A.R. Achnid is my favorite character. A.R. was the reason I started to write, and his character was so much fun. He thought he was human, and wanted to do everything with his human friend, Harold. Even though people thought of him as a scary spider, he didn’t let that get him down. He just went along with his life, enjoying all of his adventures.

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Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

I have been very lucky, and have not had any difficulties with any scenes I have written. My new novel that I am working on now, though, I am having a little bit of trouble getting past one particular scene. It is a little dark, and I am not sure in what direction I want to take the story.

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What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

I have found that finishing a story, especially a novel, is so rewarding. So much time and energy is invested in the writing of the story, and when it finally is finished and comes together to form the feelings you wanted to express, it is a tremendously gratifying experience.

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What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

Well, I am basically just starting out myself, but I would advise anyone who is starting out to believe in what you are writing. In the beginning, when I wrote something, I was always looking for approval from a family member or a friend. One day when someone told me they didn’t care for my book, my husband told me that there are going to be people who love the book and people who don’t care for it at all, but that doesn’t mean that it is a bad story. Believe in yourself is the advice my husband gave me, and continues to give me, so I would pass that on to anyone starting out.

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Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

I do not. The words come to me, and I sit down and start typing away. The whole process for me has been very simple. The only ritual I would say I have is making sure I have cookies available for when I am awake and typing at night. They are soothing to the soul.

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Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

Not really. I used to write in high school, but never gave it too much thought after that. Actually, I always wanted to be an opera singer, but, occasionally, I always found myself writing poems or short stories.

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If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

My mother, who has been gone for quite a few years now. We didn’t have a great relationship, and I would really love to sit and chat with her, getting to know her as a person. I believe, because of our volatile relationship, that I may have missed out on a wonderful friendship with a wonderful person. That breaks my heart.

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

This is from one of my children’s books, Sarah Bella’s Gift of Gold:

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When Sarah Bella was a very young girl,

(let’s say, probably about six years old),

her parents gave her a small ball of yarn,

that they said was a “gift of gold”.

Sarah Bella was then told by her parents,

“A life of adventure is waiting ahead.

Wrap your favorite things in this ball of yarn,

and when you sleep, keep it close by your bed.”

They told Sarah Bella that when she grew old,

in her ball of yarn would be memories so dear.

There would be times and places to remember,

from all of her adventures throughout the years.

The following is from my first novel, Sitting at the Kitchen Table with God:

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Andrew was gone, and Marianne should have been buried with him. There were two deaths on that day, but only one soul was taken. The other was left to slowly decay in the shell of a lonely woman.

For more information on this author, please, visit:


http://www.authorsandismith.com

http://amzn.to/2fdd1YJ


authors, books, fiction

In the Words of an Author: An Interview with Thomas Lowrie

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Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

Yes, Lee Child and Nelson DeMille.

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

All of the characters I write about are very real to me so I really have no favorite.

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Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

Scenes with death in them are difficult since I feel as though I was there as it happened.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

The ability to expand someone’s imagination.

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What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

Don’t worry about what others think, just go for it.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

Not that I know of.

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Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

No, I didn’t start writing until others asked me to do so. Now I very much enjoy it.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

Anyone who has lost their mother knows the only answer to this question.

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

I looked across my crew. I was looking for John Wayne, he wasn’t there. I looked for Arnold, same thing. I also didn’t find Stalone, Clint nor Chuck Norris. The reality of it was none of my heroes were there, this was NOT the movies. I needed just one Badass and found none.What I found was a high school yearbook.I found fresh off the farm boys, children by most people’s standards. Some of these boys weren’t even getting to go to their senior prom. I feel safe in the notion that some of them have not even held a girls hand. That doesn’t sound like much unless you haven’t done it. Think about that for a minute. They haven’t lived yet and are prepared to die.

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For more information on the author, visit:

www.thomaslowrie.com

http://amzn.to/2wyUgS9

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/he-was-thomas-william-lowrie/1119687508?ean=9780990362616

http://www.booksamillion.com/p/He-Was-Ray-Lafayette-Novel/Thomas-William-Lowrie/9780990362616?id=6025076222321
authors, books, fiction, interviews, murder-mystery, mystery

In the Words of An Author: An Interview With Lonna Enox

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Lonna Enox, cozy mystery author.

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

I grew up reading Nancy Drew mysteries, and I love Jonathan Kellerman, Robert Dugoni, Faye Kellerman, and Sue Grafton.

 

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

I think I have the most fun with Chris Reed, the local sheriff’s detective. I enjoy the banter between Reed and Sorrel. It was only during my most recent book, Striking Blind, that I realized much of his personality—not all of course—may emulate my own dad…or the cowboys around whom I grew up.

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Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

Crime scenes as well as those building up to them are difficult. I do hours of research, talk to professionals, and then my husband and I walk the area where I have set it. We take photos, and I jot notes about how tiring it is, how hot or cold, the traffic, the effects of the area, etc. I want the scenes to give enough information to keep my readers “hungry” without giving too much away.

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What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

The most rewarding part of being an author is when someone says, “I read your book and I couldn’t put it down!” or “I think Reed is so hot!” or “When’s the next one? Could you hurry?”

sorrel_mystery_lonna_enox

 

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

I would tell authors to never think they must write when they are ‘in the mood’. I just start, and it soon flows. Write routinely when you can. Research, talk to other writers, and get an editor. With a Master of Arts in English, I still need an editor—someone with fresh eyes who will see the “gaps”.

 

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please, explain.

I am an early riser, so I go to the computer in the upstairs small living room when I awake. I reread the last part I have written, look over my outline, and write. Sometimes it is great…sometimes not. But the characters speak to me best in the early morning quiet times. I seldom write on the book after lunch. That is when I handle the other ‘author stuff’—emails, requests, etc.

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Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

I think so, although I also wanted to be a teacher. My parents encouraged the second so I would “also eat regularly”.

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If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

I would love to talk to Dickens. He had such fascinating characters. I’ve always been curious whether or not he patterned them after real people. I would also like to tell my mama, “I am finally following the dream. I’m sorry I couldn’t make it happen before you left me.”

For more information on Lonna Enox, check out these websites:


Amazon – search for Lonna Enox in books. All books are available in both print and kindle formats.

Barnes and Noble – search for Lonna Enox – books are available for both printed and nook format.

Website – lonnaenox.org – order author signed copies or use the links to go to Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

Facebook – www.facebook.com/lonnaenoxauthor

authors, books, children's literature, fiction, kids books

In the Words of An Author: An Interview With K.J. Blocker

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Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so who?

PL Travers . Whimsical, yet straightforward

A good mixture of fantasy, with a slight twist of reality .

Cs Lewis, bold but not over to top storyteller I love his children’s work Great fantasy with a moral compass .

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Out of all the characters you’ve written who is your favorite? Why?

 Wow ! there’s so many great stand out characters in this book, so hard to choose just one, but I love the somewhat addled mine manager, Dusty. He’s got this really cool old-school thinking chair he can’t figure nothing without it , And he  has a signature ball close by just in case The conversation gets boring, Dusty is loyal to Pappy, unless the right offer comes along, as he’s very easy to sway . Sometimes it’s hard for Dusty to make up his mind. As the last person’s opinion he hears is the one he is most likely to go with ..I just love his child like attitude. After all …there’s a little dust in all of us

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Are there any type of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why?

For me it would be the scenes where Tom wants to believe so much that his father is dead, that he lies to both his wife and son as either wife or son have never met toms father I really do believe Tom wants his father to be alive but there’s so much pain and disappointment . He buried his father at age 18 .

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What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

To bring to life what was once only in your imagination .

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What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

If you’re an Indy writer, ideas don’t come cheap,or easy,. I’m not trying to scare you there’s just a ton of competition, and only so many buyers, for your genre .. So be different , be bold be creative, do something different to stand out, Be prepared to spend $$$ . You’re the producer . You call the shots .. But calling the shots costs ..You’ll get tired, at times feel abandon all alone . You’ll get to a point where characters make no sense, but you go on anyway, you will hear them say good luck you got a 1 million to one chance ,but if you keep going in due time ,it will become clear Cause if you feel down deep in your soul that you’re called to write . …No force, people or finances will be able to stop you . Only you. Will stop you, Because when it comes from your soul. . You won’t be able to let it go….

 

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please, explain.

I block out time, usually at night I guess you’d call it block writing . But the truth of the matter is an idea can come at anytime… So always keep the pen and paper handy .

Was being an author something you always wanted to be?

No. I thought I was gonna be a DJ . When I was a kid, I love music, and I though  that way I could meet The artist I love to listen to .

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If you could have a conversation with any one person alive or dead who would it be and why?

Carlo collod

Superfan Pinocchio.. And the lesson it taught me as a child about honesty. Just want to thank him for that work . And the impact it had on my life .


If you would like to find out more about K.J. Blocker, check out these links:

www.kjblocker.com

http://amzn.to/2wyK1gx

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/treasure-of-the-magical-mine-moppets-kj-blocker/1126822686?ean=9780999150740
authors, books, children's literature, fiction, interviews, kids books

In the Words of an Author: An Interview with Margaret Segal

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Margaret Segal, Author of “The Adventures of Harry the Inside-Outside Cat”
Children’s Books

 

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

Even though my writing isn’t remotely like his, I’ve always been inspired by William Shakespeare. His massive writing skill, and the sheer volume of what he’s created, are mind-boggling. His grasp on the vicissitudes of human nature and behavior, which comes through so well in the dialogue of his plays, is amazing. Perhaps because I enjoy writing about real life – the good, the evil, the pain and joy, the ugliness and the beauty – his writing sings to me.

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

My favorite character is Harry the Cat, who isn’t completely my “creation”, because he is a real, live cat. He never fails to entertain me with his unique and sweet personality.

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What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

Seeing your work in print, and hearing from readers that they really enjoyed your writing and/or were positively affected, touched, or moved by it.

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

Take your time, and try not to push yourself too hard. But at the same time, find a way to keep yourself motivated, but don’t drive yourself crazy over it. Writing, like, medicine or meteorology, isn’t an exact science, and it moves at its own pace sometimes. Try to go with it.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

I work writing into my everyday life, so I don’t really have what you’d call a specific “ritual”. But I DO need silence in order to write.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

Not always, but it has come to the fore in recent years. Personal and family health challenges were a huge part of my life for many years – only now that those challenges have been overcome has writing become more a part of my life.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

My mother. I would share with her the thoughts unsaid before her passing.

Where can readers go to find out about you and your books?

My website: http://www.harrytheinsideoutsidecat.com

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