books, New Release, nonfiction

Spotlight Book: 7 Simple Tricks to Remembering Names by Travis Tyler

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Synopsis

Forgetting a name can be worse than embarrassing—it can cost you in reputation, relationships, or even business. Remembering a name, on the other hand, makes you look great and can open doors.

Most of us have trouble remembering things — we’re only human, after all. The good news: Your brain has enormous memory capacity; you just need to learn how to use it.

7 Simple Tricks to Remembering Names is here to help with easy-to-remember tricks you can use anytime, anywhere. Use the techniques inside to unlock your brain’s powerful memory potential today.

You will learn:
•Why the human brain discards information—even information you’ll need
•How to memorize names (and more!) and access them anytime
•How to build your “memory palace” and store all the information you want
•Memory techniques that work for YOU

The human brain — YOUR brain — can remember names and so much more. Are you ready to unleash your amazing memory? Read 7 Simple Tricks to Remembering Names and start making better connections now

Buy It On Amazon!

 

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authors, books, interviews, nonfiction

In the Words of An Author: An Interview With Atif A K, PhD

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Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

Well I started my fascination of reading with Arthur Conan Doyle and Ian Fleming but with the passage I also recognized my fancy for non-fiction so I would say if you keep aside the marketing/strategy/branding on the more personal side I like Eckhart Tolle. He is definitely not only an author but his works amplified because of his books. I also like Dr. Daniel Amen whose works with brain rewiring has really mesmerized me. Of course, Shakespeare is always there to provide a framework to anyones comprehension. I also like the Lebanese great Khalil Jibran and his works Broken Wings and Madman very inspiring. There is also a Pakistani writer Ashfaq Ahmed- whose philosophical works transcend universalism into humanism.

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

My inspiration to writing particularly screen-writing because thats where I write most of my characters- is totally driven from the unusual faces that I see. They all tell me a story and their mental ambience. The environments from where they are hailing. I understand these faces make my task easier to dramatize both as a writer and director. So before I even met them when I use them on screen- I have a fatal portrait in my head with a reference point of someone that I saw in the train or at the bank or merely hanging at my favorite bar or local cinema. The inspire me to tell their metaphysical tales that they never told me.  

For instance, I saw a homeless guy who could have been a body double of Gregory Pack- I saw him talking to himself, he was probably unwell. But that drove me to write the street actor character on my short film Do You Know Me? where his acting rehearsal/monologue was considered talking-to-himself by many strangers around.

I find talking to ones self extremely romantic and I have used it in my upcoming film The Disowned where Kay Gamaldi (the female lead/central character) talks to herself about her affair and where she stands in the relationship. I may say that all these characters are my favorite and are inter-related to my innate fair of never talking to myself. They are linked with my inner obscurities and social phobias. In terms of writing technique in The Disowned our male protagonist (Gil Gilead) is also antagonist and it will lot of fun unleashing and cheating the audience with his character and histrionic role.  A small glimpse into it can be seen here.

https://youtu.be/4DX4xp-AM0E

Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

I like to write scenes in which there are less dialogues and more non-verbal communication. The actors use their expressions, emotions and body language to communicate the sub-text of what’s being seen. It’s like a person who can’t hear or understands the language- even who cannot read closed captions would still understand where the scene is going.

Fortunately, we are writing in an age where new media and mainstream is too much reliant on independent artists- who take liberty to approaching subject matter from brand new angles. The other versions- so to say. Just last night I saw Shape of Water and I was fascinated how in a fantasy world Del Toro and Vanessa Taylor have tricked the audience while developing a plot by building it up. Fine lining the outcasts of the previous eras while legitimizing the beauty and beast concept in a distorted, spectacular and unusual way. Sort of breaking a taboo but at the same time leaving an untouched impression of a story strangely told by unusual characters.

So these kind of scenarios may be hard to depict by the book but surely leave a stellar impression and are easier to write- if you are immune to writing things from the unprecedented angles.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

Clarity of thought is the most prized possession for any writer. The ability to think through the storm and to be able to come out survivor is so much gratifying at least for me being a writer. If I write good couple of pages every morning as I wake up- 50% of task has been achieved for me for the rest of the day. Writing is cathartic, it is therapeutic- and like Ozzy Osborne once said- he would actually pay his audience if he had to, just to let him perform. So thats the most rewarding part- I would write for free. It is sort of confessional, and letting it off your chest or sharing the fire in your belly. After that there is calm, like after a tempest. But thats not easy being able to find that poise in the way you compose your writing. Apart from commercial writing, self-indulgent writing needs lot of discourse, contemplation and self conflicts. Yes, all the questions have to be answered before they are put on paper- and sometimes, these answers dont come easy. And sometimes they take lot of time. Its like a secret watch-tower in the writers head that leads the sail in the dark. This phenomenon is much more gratifying than any other feeling. When the sail reaches the shore. And of course, financial and other accolades follow the suit. Because this is a diamond that the writer brings from a distant mine that no body knows as it exists in the clumsy minds.   

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

Get solitary confinement in a hotel and start dreaming without being buffered by anyone or anything. Of course when you read 100 pages, you are then able to write one good page. Our brains are receptive when we have lot of reference memory and observation material around. You have to be compulsive thinker. Free-thinking has always worked for me and to be able to avoid any intellectual conflict or cognitive dissonance so to say is the way out as an artist and as an author.

Unfortunately, writing prospered when it was the only mode of entertainment. In the cross media age- writing is done for various platforms. But having said that every product and entertainment starts and ends with good writing. It cannot begin without someone sitting down and composing the ideas. So in a way the scope of writing has even widened. Although there has been tremendous development in new wave media and platforms but the enhancement is not that remarkable when it comes to writing technique. We are hooked on Stephen Kings and Rowlings along with Grishams. There is more to it- in terms of substance beyond genre. And that is the reason we see some of very predictable stories emerging to be huge like Twilight and Shades of Grey. Although it is essentially recycled material in a new setting- much like Shakespeare in a standard format. But when Romeo and Juliet or Midsummer Nights Dream or even Tempest was written there was no sign of screen and a bunch of actors will play it out on theater. In that sense such intricate content was hard to be communicated so easily. So we as writers who are just started out- must start thinking out of the box while not forgetting that we are slave to the comprehension of others so whatever we may tell should not be safe but it must fit the meter as we call it when we rhyme or create an even flow in writing.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

No writing comes to me instead of the other way around. When I feel desperate to put it on screen or note it in my iPhone pad that’s when the magic starts churning. I have no idea what I am about to write- unless it keeps lingering in my subconscious and just flushes out at a point where I cannot hold it anymore. Like a secret hard to carry around, or like being a witness to some crime. You need to tell, you can’t keep it to yourself. Because the self-contemplation and no being able to share the burden and experience will ultimately leave you with immense guilt. Which if not told on time and in time will stick like a dirty deed in my psychology forever.

So that’s how I write. I may be doing laundry, or swimming, or practicing Yoga, listening to a song or just searching on Google where I parked my car. While I might later realize that I took Uber instead of my car on the way back home- I have a great idea with me, that prompts me to write. So before I go back to the mall and find my lost car- I need to put it in Word. That’s my ritual- I need a solid excuse to prefer it over any other task in my life. And that has kept my flame alive and made people pay me for this dedication to this art form.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

Absolutely. I wanted to be an astronaut but then I found writing, as I was stuck on an Executive Floor of Marriott for 8 months. It was like solitary confinement, I was left with nothing but weird life concepts buzzing through my day- in and out. I had this urge to reflect on things the way they are and the way they should or can be. I think solitude is the excellent time, when one can find their calling. This is the reason of all the prisons- around the world. To give people time to reflect and fix. I am sure without solitude; one cannot acquire a set of skills to offer the world. There is no contribution, if you are not by yourself. After that bout, I spent another couple of years as my creative pilgrimage in a downtown hotel. There I used to watch movies, sleep, eat and repeat. Strum guitar once in a while, work online and order food through room service. 

This kept on, until I was left with nothing else to do but write. I was also fortunate enough to be able to write couple of books as ghostwriter, to understand the challenges and review the process from inception to cover design. The research, statistics and reference studies all proved to be the honing ground for my creative maturity.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

William Peter Bletty writer of Exorcist as to what was going through his mind when he wrote this. This has remained to be a timeless classic and masterpiece. Ahead of time and will always be- to the point when humans can develop the technology to reach out to another dimension and communicate with dead souls. I know there was some case in Germany little similar to what was depicted in the book. But the way it was written in a passive manner was both shocking, extremely dramatic and urges you to revisit your faith or school of thought. Thats the power of writing, its like a punch on your face. His later works didnt strike the right note with the masses but thats what writing is- once the world discovers you, you are lost as a writer.   

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

Couple of pages from the book that are published on EZine Articles. Feel free to check them out.

http://ezinearticles.com/expert/Atif_A_K/2465019  

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Curious to know more? Check out these links:

http://a.co/0d8IEBM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=1IHKY0Rv01g
books, New Release, nonfiction

New From Katja Omlor

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SYNOPSIS

Marketing Bullshit is bursting with practical tips, geared to a single objective: to make you think about your actions and optimize your business from a marketing perspective. By showing you the huge potential of freebies, available online, you will be able to test many low-budget solutions and achieve high end results.

Starting with personal motivation, the author (Katja Omlor) invites us into the mesmerizing world of marketing by always staying away from bullshit of any kind. By covering aspects like new marketing, Corporate Identity and just how lazy customers might be, the book offers a non-conventional approach to this omnipotent subject.

Have you ever dealt with Customer Relationship Management? Intranet? Organising events? Internal communication and public relations? Your own website and Online Marketing?

Well, you will now. The book is different, fresh and will make you rethink many actions and processes you might have been taking for granted.

And – if everything fails, it even offers a segment on getting a job. Try it!

MarketingBullshitTeaser

Excerpt

4.6. Are there any special tools or treats the world has to offer?
Well, as a designer, this might be (personally speaking) sort of counterproductive. The internet has many things to offer, we have already discussed several special websites with free photos, banner creators, etc. There is also one very important site worth mentioning: Envato, so humbly described as “top digital assets and services.” I can tell you, they ain’t lyin’!

My favourite part is the Envato market. Here is a little secret: although I am a graphic designer, I often use this website simply as a source of inspiration. Once you discover what they have to offer, you, on the other hand, may be soon happily applying thousands of resources and saving loads of money. The website provides you with:
• Themes and templates (ThemeForest)
• Graphics and vectors (GraphicRiver)
• Photos and images (PhotoDune)
• Footage and animated graphics (VideoHive)
• Scripts and plugins (CodeCanyon)
• Music and sounds (AudioJungle)
• 3D models and textures (3DOcean)

Basically, what you will be getting here is anything your heart desires at an incredible price (e.g., templates starting at around $4). I know, sometimes it seems too good to be true. The only limitation you may face will often be buying graphic design software to edit the files.

Envato isn’t the only option for getting free resources. You know the basic rule: just Google it. One premise, however, remains constant. Nothing beats a good designer that gets to know you and your company. If you are planning on becoming a Champions League Player, you will need to kick it up a notch and personalize.

Want more information? Check out the video teaser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvK94aZwOjY

Buy It Now!

authors, books, nonfiction

In the Words of an Author: An Interview With Christy Day

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Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

I am a huge fan of
Ivan Doig (description of landscape and kindness to characters)
John McPhee (ability to write about almost any topic and make it comprehensible)
David Whyte (for his poetic insight and his metaphors)
E.B. White (for everything – humor, wit, delight in life)

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

It will be my grandfather on my father’s side, who died when my dad was 18. It will be interesting to develop his character.

Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

The challenge for me, when I write my first novel, will be to make the dialogue believable and moving.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

The most rewarding part of being an author is the connection to the reader/listener. That something I said makes a difference to readers means the world to me. I want to inspire people and move them to hope.

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

My students really liked 5-minute free-writes. I extend that for myself to twenty minutes. It is a way to limber up the mind, get the creative juices flowing, and feel ready to settle down to writing.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

I write immediately after breakfast and my 6 a.m. walk. I take the weekends off. I tend to edit as I go along and make notes about what I want to research. I write thoughts down as they occur and keep them in a notebook for use later. I always have water and coffee at my side and I often stop to snack on something homemade as a reward for sticking to it.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

In a way, yes, in a way, no. I did always want to write a book and when I walked El Camino de Santiago de Compostela, I knew the book inside me was ready to be written. My mother was a beautiful writer and she never did write the short stories (her favorite medium) she threatened to. I thought that was a shame.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

I would love to have a conversation with Eleanor Roosevelt. What a powerhouse. In a man’s world, she made all the difference, and she connected to the richest of the rich and the poorest of the poor in equal measure. How did she keep her courage and compassion together?

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

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There will be times when you are walking that your spirit is awakened and the universe pauses to let you be in that moment. Such was that hour that I sat in utter solitude and damp silence in the quiet dark church, Vilar de Donas, and I felt the monumental meaning of the Pilgrimage. The best you can do is be as fully in the moment as possible and keep good records – journaling, notes, photos, so that when you return and process your experience – a lifetime endeavor for sure – you can deepen your memory and be able to share it meaningfully with others. It would be impossible to see it all, understand it all, and appreciate every detail. You barely scratch the surface. When you get back, you will wish there had been more hours in each day, more energy in your tired body, and more awareness in the moment of just how extraordinary each place was. In some amazing way, we truly do become ourselves more deeply as we walk this Pilgrimage. (pp 72-73)

http://www.walkingelcamino.com/

authors, books, christian literature, nonfiction

In the Words of an Author: An Interview with Carolyn Denise Owens

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

I started writing short stories, etc. when I was around 7 years old, so I can’t really say if my writing was influenced by other writers, writing is my passion and I started writing at a very young age, because of my love for it.

Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

I write from my heart and since my writing is primarily non-fiction I can’t say that one person is any more difficult to write about than another.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

For me, the most rewarding part is to inspire a young person who wants to be a writer. I met a 6-year-old girl a couple of years back and she was so excited to meet a “real live author” in person as she stated. I was excited that she was excited and I just hope that the fact that I’d accomplished my goal of writing would inspire her to do the same.

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

I want them to know that writing is something that you do because you love it and not to seek, fame or fortune. If fame and fortune comes, then that’s the icing on the cake, but don’t look for it. Writing is a hard business and you have to be very persistent and even more patient to make it, but more than that you have to love what you do and have a genuine interest in the subjects you choose to write about.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

Many of my writing ideas or inspirations will come to me in a dream. I still jot down ideas and write them in a notebook as opposed to a computer. I keep a notepad next to my bed so that if I dream about something that I need to write about, the pad is right there so that I can start writing as much of the information that I can remember. Also, I will set aside time to meditate on my writing and brainstorm to come up with different titles,subjects and so forth.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

Indeed, I started writing at a very young age. I was around 7 years old when I started writing short stories and poems.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

If I could speak to anyone person, I think that it would be Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the reason why is that even though great strides have been made due to his efforts and the efforts of others like him, sometimes I wonder and wish that I could ask him if the sacrifice was worth the benefit. It seems that people of all colors, religions, and races take his sacrifices for granted and don’t value his love for humanity to the extent that they have chosen not to build on the legacy and foundation that he laid. Sometimes, I wonder if he would have rather worked at a school or a factory and just live his life in obscurity and raised his family, instead of laying his life down for humanity because of the thanklessness of the people who benefited from his efforts.

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

From “Timeless Wisdom”

front

You Have to Execute!

“Gathering up a bunch of ideas and doing nothing with them is just like collecting garbage in garbage bags in your house, if you never make it to the curb with the garbage bags, all you are is an organized hoarder. Sure, the garbage isn’t all over the floor and the counter, it might be bagged up, but you need to get it to the curb for the garbage collector in order to have accomplished anything. You’ve got to execute. That’s the same way it is with an idea. Collecting ideas and doing nothing with them is useless.” (Vincent Owens)
I’ve heard it said many times some of the greatest books that weren’t written, and some of the greatest songs that weren’t put to melodies, are in the graveyard. If you have a goal that you want to accomplish, go for it! It may be a book that needs writing, a poem that you want to recite, or a song that you want to sing. There is no such thing as waiting for the right time, because the right time is now. Waiting is sort of like a runner preparing for the Olympics all of his life, and on the day before the big event he breaks his leg. You have to enter some smaller races before you get ready for the big one.

If you have a goal, start small and build on each success little by little.
Look at three areas of your life:  Spiritual, Financial, Health and set goals that are attainable. See what you can accomplish in the next three months.  Set down write the goals and make them plain and make sure they are not pipe dreams, but realistic, attainable goals. Once one set of goals is obtained, set other goals and build on them.
“Yard by yard it’s hard; inch by inch it’s a cinch.”

Follow the link below to get your copy!

authors, books, children's literature, Coming Soon, cover reveal, interviews, kids books, nonfiction, Uncategorized

An Inside Look At Author Zena Xenae

About the Author!

(In her own words)

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I write both Adult Novels and Children’s stories. I am the owner of Glamma LLC books and publishing. All my books can be purchased at Barnes and Noble and on Amazon.com, My published tittles are Cruel Awakening and Tyler the Wonderkid. My upcoming tittles are Inside Out, Chemo Curls and Pink Awakening My Breast Cancer Journey. I can be followed on instagram @cruelawakening and on facebook “cruel awakening the book” I am a survivor.

INTERVIEW

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

E.L James. She inspired me to write even though I thought I had missed my opportunity. She showed me that it was never to late to pursue a dream.

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

My Adult novels thus far have all been based on life events. The characters are real, but I am looking forward to putting my creative juices together and come with a character that my readers will love. However for now I would say Sessie from Cruel Awakening is my favorite character she was my best friend; she died before the book was released. I love that I am able to have her continue to live through my writings.

Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

In Cruel Awakening the scene where I have to try and save my children from being abused and trying to shield them as they escaped was the most difficult. I cried through every letter I typed and it was so painful that i put off completing the book for like 15 years because i couldn’t bring myself to complete the chapter.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

Holding your book in your hand after it comes from the publisher. The most rewarding part was hearing from other women who were victims of abuse and them telling me my story helped them and made them feel that they were not alone, and that I inspired them to tell their story.

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

Don’t ever give up on yourself and don’t be discouraged.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

I love to listen to Caribbean music or the sound ocean waves when I’m writing.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

I’m not sure if I wanted to be an author but I’ve known since I was a young child that I loved telling stories. As I child I would write stories then read them to my family. When I went away to summer camp in 6th grade, every night all the girl would come to our bunk to hear me tell them stories it was like I was the television.

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

Tyler Perry, I would love to know how he gets so much writing done. He is a creative genius when it comes to writing and storytelling.

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

“You can’t have me, Angelo. You lose. You can’t control me. I will escape this madness, let God be my witness. You don’t deserve me. I’m taking all my love back. You can’t do what you want. You can’t hurt me, and you can’t try and tear me down because you are not man enough inside. I have a good heart. I am a good a woman. I have loved you an immeasurable amount. There is no weighted average here. It was all real but what do you do?– From “Cruel Awakening”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CRUEL AWAKENING

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00064]

SYNOPSIS

Cruel Awakening is one woman’s story of abuse, based on actual events set in Baltimore MD in the early 80’s. It starts off as a love story between Angelo and Zikiyah, after the birth of their first child things take a turn for the worse. It gives a truthful look inside a real domestic situation. the physical abuse, substance abuse, infidelities, and a whole turmoil of mixed in drama. Promises to shed light on the domestic violence question of “Why do they stay?” or “Why do they leave?” a page turner, a jaw dropper with very intense love scenes , not for the faint of heart. ends in a very dramatic manner. It will make you laugh, make you cry, make you angry! Intended for mature audiences.

AMAZON BUY LINK

TYLER THE WONDERKID: SHARK ADVENTURE

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SYNOPSIS

Tyler and his Grandpa takes their secret invention with them to the beach. When Tyler and his friends go surfing, they find that they are in for a shark filled adventure. Full of surprises!

AMAZON BUY LINK

UPCOMING TITLES:

minaj_cover

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00050]

authors, books, driving, interviews, New Release, nonfiction, travel, Uncategorized

In the Words of An Author: An Interview With Jessie Newburn

Have there been any authors who have influenced your work? If so, who?

All of them? None come to mind. Oh, how about Dr. Seuss! I’m grateful that I read as a child and that my parents read to me and encouraged me to read.

Out of all the characters you’ve written, who is your favorite? Why?

I don’t write about characters, per se … not in the way a fiction book has characters. Though I write about characters aplenty, as I write about each and every single passenger that I pick up in my time out as an Uber driver.

Are there any types of scenes you find more difficult to write? Which ones and why.

Sometimes the stories flow out of me. Sometimes they don’t. When it feels as though I’m trying too hard, I probably am.

What would you say the most rewarding part of being an author is?

Someone I admire–a man a decade or so my senior–and one who has been in a writing group for years said to me recently that writing allows a much deeper exploration of the writer’s mind and thinking than happens in most conversations. I like being able to share how I see things, what’s going through my mind as life happens. And it makes me happy when other people’s lives are touched for the better by my words and perspective.

What advice do you have for authors just starting out in their journey?

It’s a journey. Oh, and you better be learning how to do book marketing along the way, too. In 2014, word on the street, i.e. the internet, was that a new book for sale was posted on Amazon every five minutes.

In the last 30 days, 90,825 books have been published on Kindle alone. Ninety thousand, eight hundred and twenty-five. Think on that.

Do you have a writing ritual? If so, please explain.

Because I write about my experiences as an Uber driver, I aim to write within a day of driving. There are so many details I include in the conversations and interactions, and I don’t take notes, so I want to get the stories out of me while they are fresh.

Was being an author something you always wanted to do?

Meh. Maybe. Sort of. I’ve always felt rather overwhelmed by the volume of books available that I want to read and will probably not get to. So I never felt compelled to add one more to the pile. But now that I’m doing it, I like it!

If you could have a conversation with any one person, alive or dead, who would it be and why?

I’d have a conversation with one of the Egyptian pyramid makers, and I’d say, “No really. Tell me the scoop. How in the world did you make these things because it’s pretty clear that the archaeological story we’re told about them doesn’t add up.”

Would you care to provide an excerpt from one of your books as a sample of your work?

Do I tip?
Next up, two guys at a restaurant-bar in Canton. One in the front seat, one in the back. You smell like french fries, I say before my manners can kick in. They review their meal out loud and conclude, yes, they have had fries.

They’re both white, one in his late 30s, the other in his mid-40s. One is visiting but used to live in the area. We’re heading out of the city to some place I’ve never heard of before, some small, older suburb. Wherever it is, I know it’s closer to my home, and I was already feeling that this would be my last ride for the night.

They’ve had a bit to drink, but they’re pleasant enough. A bit slurred in speech but friendly. The guy in the front tells me the company he works for. I know the brand. It’s a quality brand product in a niche market. I tell him I know this. He is impressed with me and proud with himself.

He asks me a most thought-provoking question: Do I find driving for Uber relaxing? Hmm. Interesting question. Typically, I, don’t care to drive, I tell him. And I certainly haven’t find driving to be relaxing.

But I realize, as I answer his question, that it is actually quite relaxing to drive for Uber. And I realize why. I have no attachment. I do have a responsibility and a desire to get my rider from Point A to Point B as comfortably, quickly and safely as possible, but I have no attachment to their experience beyond the ride.

If they are late to a concert, that’s not my issue. If they are coming from their girlfriend’s house and just had an argument, it’s not my issue. I’m only doing the driving.

Also, much of what I sometimes find stressful about going places—parking, arriving in a timely manner, transitioning my energy from being by myself in the car to being at an event—are not things I have to worry about, at all. I simply drive.

I arrive at their destination. The front-seat guy asks, How does this work? Oh, your friend’s Uber account will handle the transaction and payment, I tell him. Do I tip you? I tell him what my friend whose Ubering experience got me curious about driving says to her passengers: It’s not necessary.
He opens his wallet and we both see the same thing at the same time: he has a $20 and a $100 bill. He grunts, looks at me and says it was really nice riding with me. I fill in the gap of awkwardness and say, But not worth a $20 tip. He laughs, grateful for the understanding, and gives me a hug. They exit my vehicle. I head home.

Key experience: As I close my first night out Ubering, I’m particularly fond of my first and my last trips; and I find Ubering a nice shining star along a path I’m choosing to walk (or drive) now. I can’t wait to get out again!

 

Keep Up With Jessie!

Amazon link is http://amzn.to/29ICjtt
FB page is https://www.facebook.com/uberchronicles/
Website is http://www.uber-chronicles.com (will be up by July 19th, the book’s publish date)